Dating an Addict: Should I Stay or Should I Go?

Alcohol and drug abuse is the source of many problems for those who engage in this behavior. One of the earliest casualties from substance abuse will be intimacy. It is just not possible for people to abuse mind altering substances and maintain healthy relationships. As the individual falls deeper into addiction it will completely take over their life, and there will be no room for anyone else. The person falls into delusion and self absorption, and they will stay that way until they manage to escape their addiction. Once they enter recovery they will need to work hard in order to regain the ability to be intimate and enjoy healthy sexual relationships. The word intimacy comes from a Latin word meaning inner.

How to Repair Relationships Broken by Addiction

Relationships can be stressful in any circumstance. It is not easy to find someone who shares your values, will be supportive of you and your life goals, and is pursuing the goals you support. Even when everything is sparkly and new in the beginning, there are always a few red flags that pop up that indicate some work will be required in the future.

The good news is that everyone is different. Not everyone is in the same place in their relationship with drugs and alcohol or their ability to handle a serious relationship.

You may not be the top priority if your partner is battling addiction. The substance comes first. It doesn’t mean they don’t still love & care about.

We’re Here to Help As an essential healthcare provider, We are open and supporting those in need of addiction treatment at all locations. Learn More. From creating attractive online dating profiles to attempting to decipher all the different signals someone is sending your way, dating is a dizzying experience. But then, you meet someone you connect with almost instantly. You like the same hobbies, have similar senses of humor and talk for hours at a time. Perfect, right? You just need to understand what it means to date someone in addiction recovery.

In some cases, it started with an opioid prescription from a doctor after an injury or surgery that quickly spiraled out of control. For others, heroin may have been a fun experiment that took a wrong turn or a way for them to escape depression, anxiety or another mental health challenge. The simple answer to this question is, yes.

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When they finally manage to get past all of the chemical baggage that they had been carrying with them for so long, what you will find in most instances is that former addicts have just as many outstanding qualities as anyone else, and this can make them a joy to be around for family and friends alike. But what about romance, dating, and even marriage? Is it wise to form a more intimate connection with an ex-addict or alcoholic, no matter how dramatically they appear to have turned their lives around?

In looking at the experiences of others, what we can say is that many who have formed romantic partnerships with former substance abusers have come to regret that decision immensely, while others have been able to establish satisfying permanent relationships with those who have successfully put their past addictions behind them.

Recovering alcoholics and relationships can be a match made in heaven or a slippery slope into relapse. The person in recovery is ultimately responsible for.

There are many people who are a little unsure about what to expect when dating someone with an addictive personality. It can be challenging to understand what your significant other is dealing with and experiencing. Maybe the individual suffered from substance dependence for months, even years. Now, he or she is in recovery, working to build a life free from addiction.

Many times, people who are in recovery are advised to avoid romantic relationships for at least a year. It allows them to spend more time working on themselves and overcoming the negative effects of addiction. It also gives them time to heal from the pain of substance dependence.

How to Manage a Relationship With Someone Recovering From Addiction

Updated on July 1st, Drug users are crafty and can be very good at hiding their addiction from even those who are very close to them. Emotional issues and domestic problems are often commonplace when a drug addict is taking part in a close relationship, and even when these issues are absent, it can be tough to develop a sustained relationship. There are several things that could indicate that your partner is using or abusing drugs and trying to hide it from you.

If your partner is sober and experiences a relapse into alcoholism or drug addiction, it might be difficult to support them – or to stay sober yourself.

We recommend that newly sober men and women avoid major life changes within their first year of recovery — and this includes getting into romantic relationships. Not only do relationships serve as distractions, but they can prove to be relapse triggers if they end. Many sober men and women choose to date people that are also in recovery.

In some ways, this is beneficial. These include:. In some circumstances, dating someone who is also in recovery might prove to be a challenge. It could be a challenge if:. These might include:. But when is the appropriate time to talk about it, and what should you say when the moment feels right? Here are some suggestions:. I experimented with drugs and alcohol for awhile and eventually realized that my life would be a lot better off without them.

If questions are asked which they probably will be , answer them if you feel comfortable doing so. Give us a call for more advice, or with any general recovery-related questions you might have!

Dating a Drug Addict: How You Can Help You and Your Partner

Are you falling for a recovering addict? Are you curious to know more? Keep reading to learn the truth about addiction and what questions to ask before you start dating a recovering addict. Most of the time, the will to get better is not enough for a person to enter into a state of recovery.

Commonly known as a relapse, a recurrence of substance use disorder symptoms isn’t a sign of failure. Here’s what experts say about.

Falling for someone might seem fantastic, but when the truth of drug abuse sets in it can become a nightmare. You find yourself wondering, are relationships supposed to suck this bad? Why is this person like this? Will they ever change? This is where you learn how to leave a drug addict. You spend hours on the internet figuring out what addiction and its signs look like. The hiding spots. What their eyes can prove to you.

What you want to say. What they might do. Who they might be seeing. When they go out, you pace around with a knot in your stomach, analyzing every possible situation. Maybe you know that twinge of guilt too well— cleaning up after them, feeling a lie come out of their mouth but trying not to feel defeated by it, constantly questioning your own gut reaction to subtle damaging behaviors.

8 Tips for Dating Someone in Recovery

For example, addicts can backslide and begin using his or her substance of choice once again, known as a relapse. All of that being said, you might meet someone incredible who has many of the traits you are looking for in a partner, but who might also be struggling with addiction or be in the midst of recovery. When someone is dating an addict a nd that partner is in the midst of alcohol or drug addiction, it is easy for the sober partner to get caught up in the whirlwind of the partner who is addicted.

The reason behind this thinking is that substance abuse can really warp how people see themselves and their life. Once in recovery, you are just founding out again who you are while also trying to form healthy relationships with people on a similar journey. It is only through a time of reflection and sobriety that you can once again learn who you are and how you want to move forward in your life to get where you want to go.

Are you in a relationship with someone who you think is addicted to drugs or alcohol? Find out the key behaviors to look for and how to.

It has long been known that marriage or other long-term, committed relationships and substance abuse don’t mix. Having a partner who drinks too much or uses drugs is very much like throwing a stone into a still pond: the effects ripple out and influences all that is near. In the case of a partner who uses drugs or drinks too much, the effect is felt by his or her children, relatives, friends, and co-workers.

However, many would argue that, aside from the abuser, the greatest price is often paid by the abuser’s partner. Couples in which a partner abuses drugs or alcohol are often very unhappy; in fact, these partners are often more unhappy than couples who don’t have problems with alcohol or other drugs, but who seek help for marital problems.

As drinking or drug use gets worse, it starts to take more and more time away from the couple, taking its toll by creating an emotional distance between the partners that is difficult to overcome. These couples also report that they fight and argue a great deal, which sometimes can become violent. It is often the fighting itself that can create an environment or situation in which the partner with the drinking or drug problems uses these substances to reduce his or her stress.

When the substance use eventually becomes one of the main reasons for fighting or arguing, what we see happen is a vicious cycle, in which substance use causes conflict, the conflict leads to more substance use as a way of reducing tension, conflict about the substance use escalates, more drinking or drug use occurs, and so on. Couples in which a partner abuses drugs or alcohol have a very difficult time getting out of this downward spiral; fortunately, we also know of proven ways to help these relationships and, in the process, help the substance abuser recover.

The Dating Index: Dating Someone with an Addiction


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